PAYE late filing and late payment penalties

HMRC has confirmed that it will continue its risk-based approach to payroll Real Time Information (RTI) PAYE late filing and late payment penalties this tax year.

Rather than late filing and late payment penalties being issued automatically, HMRC will continue to issue them on a risk-assessed basis during 2019/20. HMRC has also confirmed that penalties for 2019/20 will be issued from September 2019.

The August issue of the Employer Bulletin confirms:

‘HMRC will not charge penalties automatically for 2019/20, provided a Full Payment Submission (FPS) is filed within three days of the payment date. Where there is a pattern of persistent late-filing within three days of the statutory filing date, employers will be reviewed and may be charged a filing penalty as part of HMRC’s risk-based approach.’

The deadline for cleared electronic payments is the 22nd of the month following the end of tax month. For cheque payments or other non-electronic methods, payment is due by the 19th.

HMRC may charge interest on the amount outstanding for late payment, which will accrue until the total amount is paid. Contact us for help with payroll matters.

Internet link: Employer Bulletin

 

As an employer, you normally have to operate PAYE as part of your payroll. PAYE is HM Revenue and Customs’ (HMRC) system to collect Income Tax and National Insurance from employment.

You do not need to register for PAYE if none of your employees are paid £118 or more a week, get expenses and benefits, have another job or get a pension. However, you must keep payroll records.

Payments and deductions

When paying your employees through payroll you also need to make deductions for PAYE.

Payments to your employees

Payments to your employees include their salary or wages, as well as things like any tips or bonuses, or statutory sick or maternity pay.

Deductions from their pay

From these payments, you’ll need to deduct tax and National Insurance for most employees. Other deductions you may need to make include student loan repayments or pension contributions.

Reporting to and paying HMRC

Reporting pay and deductions

If you run payroll yourself, you’ll need to report your employees’ payments and deductions to HMRC on or before each payday.

Your payroll software will work out how much tax and National Insurance you owe, including an employer’s National Insurance contribution on each employee’s earnings above £166 a week.

You’ll need to send another report to claim any reduction on what you owe HMRC, for example for statutory pay.

Paying HMRC

You’ll be able to view what you owe HMRC, based on your reports. You then have to pay them, usually every month.

If you’re a small employer that expects to pay less than £1,500 a month, you can arrange to pay quarterly – contact HMRC’s payment enquiry helpline.

 

Leave A Comment

By continuing to use this site, you agree to the use of cookies. more info

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close